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Table 12 Significant univariate predictors considered across all studies grouped by type

From: Effects of sixty six adolescent tobacco use cessation trials and seventeen prospective studies of self-initiated quitting

Demographics Bonding opportunities
   Non-white – 1 study    Higher grades – 2 studies
   Higher socioeconomic status – 1 study    Got married – 2 studies
   Male gender – 2 studies, female gender – 1 study    Parental support – 2 studies
  Higher parental expectancies for child – 1 study
Behavior-related  
     Less allowance – 1 study
   Low intention to smoke in future – 6 studies    Less leisure time – 1 study
   Lower pretest smoking – 6 studies    Less strict peers – 1 study
   Less smoking experience – 6 studies    Network values agreement – 1 study
   Lower alcohol use – 1 study    Less parental education – 1 study
   Better diet – 1 study  
   "Not want to quit now" – 1 study Psychology
     Less depressed – 1 study
Beliefs/attitudes toward smoking    Less perceived stress – 1 study
     Self-concern – 1 study greater, 1 lower
   Higher morality/social control of tobacco use – 3 studies  
   Stereotypes of smokers thwarted – 2 studies  
   Negative outcome expectancies of use – 2 studies Perceived social
   Disapprove of others smoking – 2 studies  
   Positive program outcome expectancies – 1 study    Fewer friends smoke – 12 studies
     No parent/sibling smoking – 4 studies
     Lower social acceptability – 2 studies
Lifestyle perceptions  
     Spouse is a non-smoker – 2 studies
   High importance on health as a value – 2 studies    Parent don't like smoking – 1 study
   High sense of coherence – 1 study    Fewer offers to smoke – 1 study
   Perceived lifestyle incongruence – 1 study  
Life skills  
   Greater refusal assertion skill – 2 studies  
   Higher self-esteem – 1 study  
   Better decision making skills – 1 study  
   Better stress management skills – 1 study  
  1. Directionality was aligned such that these predictors showed higher quit-rates. Each entry indicates number of studies that found this variable to be a significant predictor.