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Table 1 Descriptive statistics of 2969 Black, Latino and White Older Adults (age >50 at baseline) who were current smokers at baseline (year 1992)

From: Latino and Black smokers in the Health and Retirement Study are more likely to quit: the role of light smoking

  Black (N = 569) Latino (N = 244) White (N = 2,156) Total p-value
  % % % %  
Age group (range 50–74)      
 50–59 years 86.5 89.8 87.3 87.4 0.554
 60+ years 13.5 10.2 12.7 12.6  
Gender      
 Women 44.2 43.6 51.3 49.9 0.008>
Marital status      
 Married 46.2 60.4 72.6 68.7 <0.001
 Formerly married 45.2 34.7 25.0 28.1  
 Never married 8.6 4.9 2.3 3.2  
Education      
 Low (less than high school) 45.8 65.9 28.8 33.1 <0.001
 High (high school or greater) 54.2 34.1 71.2 66.9  
Chronic medical condition counta (range 0–6) (mean, SE) 1.1 (0.06) 0.8 (0.07) 0.8 (0.02) 0.8 (0.02) <0.001
Depression: CES-D 8 item scale (score ≥4) 36.6 43.5 28.6 30.4 <0.001
Alcohol: drinks per day      
 0 36.1 39.2 31.6 32.6 0.044
 1-2/day 55.6 49.5 58.1 57.3  
  > 2/day 8.3 11.3 10.3 10.1  
Average number of cigarettes smoked per day (mean, SE) 13.4 (0.39) 15.8 (1.24) 22.6 (0.36) 21.0 (0.29) <0.001
Quit within 10 years (restricted to those still being followed in 2002)      
 Yes 46.8 52.0 45.9 46.4 0.438
Quit within 20 years (restricted to those still being followed in 2012)      
 Yes 64.0 65.3 64.4 64.4 0.974
  1. CES-D Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CESD); 8 –item version of scale was used; scores of four or greater considered depressed
  2. aCount of chronic medical conditions includes: diabetes, heart disease, emphysema/asthma, stroke, cancer, and hypertension