Skip to main content

Table 3 Multivariate analysis for factors associated with spouses quitting during their wives pregnancy, China (n=328)

From: A neglected opportunity for China’s tobacco control? Shift in smoking behavior during and after wives’ pregnancy

Factors Quitting smoking Adjusted ORa P-value
Yes No (95%CI)  
Age (years)
 < 30 13 82 1.00 0.653
 30–35 29 148 1.07 (0.44,2.58)  
 35+ 8 48 1.70 (0.51,5.63)  
Education
 < =Secondary School 6 80 1.00 0.451
 High School 19 70 1.05 (0.23,4.76)  
 College 17 87 1.94 (0.54,6.96)  
 Above College 8 41 0.86 (0.27,2.71)  
Income (CNY)
 < 5000 20 109 1.00 0.151
 5000–10000 12 97 0.40 (0.14,1.13)  
 10000+ 18 72 0.74 (0.27,2.55)  
Residence
 Non-Shanghai 29 176 1.00 0.033
 Shanghai 21 102 2.76 (1.08,7.04)  
Study site
 District 1 30 130 1.00 0.039
 District 2 20 148 2.24 (1.04,4.85)  
Smoking status before pregnancy
 Daily smoker 15 220 1.00 <0.0001
 Occasional smoker 35 58 4.83 (2.22,10.48)  
Smoking years
 ≥ 10 14 154 1.00 0.018
 < 10 36 124 2.80 (1.19, 6.58)  
Smoking at home
 Yes 15 174 1.00 <0.0001
 No 35 104 4.48 (1.94,10.39)  
Wife received education on harms of tobacco
 No 13 90 1.00 0.238
 Yes 37 188 1.68 (0.71,4.01)  
Social use
 Yes 17 152 1.00 0.001
 No 33 126 4.05 (1.74,9.41)  
Under financial pressure
 High 21 83 1.00 <0.0001
 Low 29 195 5.28 (2.14,13.02)  
Perception of cigarette price
 Expensive 37 202 1.00 0.245
 Not expensive 13 76 1.70 (0.70,4.01)  
Influenced by family membersb
 No 18 154 1.00 0.013
 Yes 32 124 2.82 (1.25,6.38)  
  1. aAdjusted for age, education, income, residence and study site
  2. bThis includes persuading husband not to smoke, setting rules at home or asking husbands to smoke in a designated area
\