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Table 5 Logistic regression analyses examining predictors of e-cigarette perceived harm and addictiveness

From: Associations of attitudes towards electronic cigarettes with advertisement exposure and social determinants: a cross sectional study

    Perceived Harm (n = 5921) Perceived Addictiveness (n = 5832)
    aOR (Wald CI) logit aOR (Wald CI) logit
Race   NonWhite 1 ref 1 ref
   White 1.31 (1.17–1.47) 0.2702** 0.93 (0.83-1.05) −0.0698
Gender   Female 1 ref 1 ref
   Male 1.69 (1.54–1.86) 0.5245** 1.60 (1.45–1.76) 0.4689**
E-Cigarette Non User 1 ref 1 ref
   User 3.17 (2.80–3.58) 1.1524** 2.77 (2.45–3.13) 1.0169**
Smoking History      
  Individual Yes 1 ref 1 ref
   No 1.78 (1.56–2.04) 0.5775** 1.08 (0.94–1.23) 0.0757
  Mother Yes 1 ref 1 ref
   No 1.22 (1.11–1.36) 0.1992** 1.03 (0.93–1.14) 0.0504
Advertising seen on      
  Internet No 1 ref 1 ref
   Yes 1.19 (1.08–1.31) 0.1775* 1.05 (0.95–1.16) 0.0503
  TV No 1 ref 1 ref
   Yes 1.06 (0.97–1.16) 0.0582 1.04 (0.95–1.15) 0.0430
  Magazine No 1 ref 1 ref
   yes 0.96 (0.87–1.06) −0.0402 0.91 (0.82–1.01) −0.0912
  1. Race was coded 1 = White, 0 = Non-White; Gender was coded 1 = Male, 0 = Female; E-Cigarette User was coded 1 = User, 0 = Non-User; Individual smoking history was coded 1 = Yes, 0 = No; Mother’s smoking history was coded 1 = Yes, 0 = No; Internet advertising was coded 1 = Yes, 0 = No; TV advertising was coded 1 = Yes, 0 = No; Magazine Advertising was coded 1 = Yes, 0 = No
  2. Higher aOR represent lower perceived harm and addictiveness relative to reference group
  3. Abbreviations: aOR adjusted odds ratio, CI confidence interval
  4. *p < 0.05, ** p <0.01
  5. P values are within model